terça-feira, 18 de abril de 2017

CANAIS DO YOUTUBE PARA ESTUDAR



Existem muitas opções no youtube para se ter dicas e estudar um pouco de inglês, é muito importante em primeiro lugar que você foque e entenda qual sua real necessidade para que assim não fique perdido passando de um canal a outro, de um vídeo a outro sem conseguir de fato estudar o que tem real dificuldade.

Nunca é indicado estudar pronúncia pela internet, na verdade pelo youtube se usa mais dicas para estudar e para compreender melhor gramática em geral, expressões idiomáticas e uso da língua no dia a dia.

Alguns canais bons para se pegar dicas de gramática são:
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC4cmBAit8i_NJZE8qK8sfpA – este é um canal com uma americana que dá dicas de gramática.

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCU9X8evGAdB_ffE0btMOxTQ – este canal faz um passo a passo para aprender e estudar pontos gramaticais.

Alguns canais bons para estudar expressões idiomáticas e seus usos:
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCgzuT-fpJiyThTUlMiFRCKQ – este é um canal que possuem vários professores dando dicas diferentes.

Um canal que muitos alunos gostam 

Uma dica de um canal divertido para aprender com música 

Muito importante lembrar e salientar que nada disso substitui sua aula na escola presencial, nosso curso de inglês Ido é maravilhoso essas são só algumas dicas para você poder estudar em casa de uma forma mais descontraída e divertida. Nada substitui seu professor e seus livros que foram feitos com tanto cuidado para te ajudar aprender de maneira eficiente focado na comunicação.

Esse foi mais um post do Blog do Curso de Inglês Microcamp. 

quinta-feira, 30 de março de 2017

ENGLISH FOR CULINARY



Do you joke around that you’re a “terrible cook” while chowing down on yet another carton of Chinese food? Do you always say you should learn how to cook but just don’t have the time?

If you’ve never been taught, building a cooking habit can seem pretty daunting. I know this because I used to struggle in the kitchen too. I spent most of my life surviving on turkey and mayo sandwiches, frozen pizza, and restaurant meals. When I could build up enough motivation to cook something, I’d just boil pasta.

In hindsight, the excuses I employed seem ridiculous, but I remember how difficult (and frustrating) it was to want to make a lifestyle change, but lack the know-how to do so. Eventually, through years of trial and error, I figured out how to change my habits.

HOW TO DITCH THE EXCUSES AND LEARN TO COOK


The first step in building a sustainable cooking habit is to address your challenges head on and come up with rational solutions. Here are some of the most common reasons people say they can’t cook, and tips to overcome each one.

The Excuse: I Don’t Have Time




This popular excuse is pretty powerful, and we use this rationale to avoid much more than cooking. To overcome this block, the most important thing that’s needed is a shift in mindset.
“Not having time” is just a matter of priorities. If learning how to cook isn’t a priority for you, then you’re doomed, regardless of effort. If cooking is important to you, you can make time by shifting around other activities. For example, before I learned how to cook, I’d get home from work each night and watch TV. When I said I didn’t have time to make dinner, I really meant that I’d rather watch another episode of It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia than cook. Tackle this block with the following steps:

1. Write it down. Start by recording what you do every day when you get home, along with a rough estimate of how much time you spend doing each activity. Don’t leave anything out. Do you go out for drinks with friends? Watch TV? Play games on your phone? Write everything down.

2. Prioritize. Next, look at each item on the list and think about whether or not it’s more important to you than cooking yourself a healthy meal. Maybe you can cut 30 minutes out of watching TV or cut out Angry Bird completely. Find the time.

3. Try it out. Commit to a one-week trial in which you swap in cooking activities for the time you would have spent doing a task of lesser importance. Once that week is over, commit to another week—and so on.

But before you can learn how to cook a good meal it is very important to learn some very important vocabulary.

Here follows a list with some basic and very important vocabulary concerning cooking.
Bake – To cook in an oven.

Barbecue – To cook on a grill over a charcoal or seasoned wood fire usually with a tomato based sauce. Customarily outside.

Beat – Combine vigorously with the intent to force air into the mixture.

Blanch – Cook or dip quickly into very hot water to remove external material.

Blend – Mix together gently until the consistency is the same throughout.

Boil – Cook in hot water.

Braise – Cook over an open flame with the flame touching the food.

Bread – To dip or roll food in a liquid and then breadcrumbs until covered.

Brew – Verb used to describe the process of making a potable flavored mixture. (tea, beer)

Broil – To cook with the heat source above the food.

Brown- Cook only until there is a light brown color.

Chop – Cut into small pieces.

Combine – Mix together. (Usually used with dry ingredients)

Cube or dice – Cut into small squares.

Cut in – Mix together gently with the edge of the mixing tool.

Deep-fry – With enough oil to cover the food.

Fold in – Mix together gently with the flat of the mixing tool.

Form – Mold into a certain shape.

Fry – Cook in hot oil.

Grate – To use a grater to shred food. (Usually vegetables or cheese)

Knead – Work dough with the hands, constantly folding.

Marinade – The liquid used to marinate. Q.v.

Marinate – Soak (especially meat) in a spiced liquid. Usually but not always overnight.

Mince – Chop into small pieces. Smaller than cubed. Q.v.

Pan fry – With just enough oil to keep the food from sticking.

Pare – To remove the peel.

Pureé – Reduce to a watery consistency.

Roast – Cook in a covered pot either on the stove or in the oven.

Sauté – Cook in a small amount of oil until browned.

Scald – To pour hot water over something or dip it in the water.

Sear – To drop food (usually meat) in a very hot pan to seal in juices.

Separate (eggs) – Remove the egg yolk from the albumen.

Simmer – Cook over a low flame.

Steep – To let sit in hot water. (For example tea)

Stew – A very thick soup with a flour base.

Toast – Lightly brown.

Toss – To gently mix a salad.

Whip – Beat rapidly to force air into a mixture.

Whip up (something) – Informal term for preparing a quick meal.


Até o próximo post!



sexta-feira, 17 de março de 2017

ADJECTIVES AND ADVERBS OF FREQUENCY

             

1. THE ADVERBS AND THE ADJECTIVES IN ENGLISH


Adjectives tell us something about a person or a thing. Adjectives can modify nouns (here: girl) or pronouns (here: she).
Adverbs tell us in what way someone does something. Adverbs can modify verbs (here: drive), adjectives or other adverbs.

adjectiveadverb
Mandy is a careful girl.Mandy drives carefully.
She is very careful.She drives carefully.

Mandy is a careful driver. This sentence is about Mandy, the driver, so use the adjective.
Mandy drives carefully. This sentence is about her way of driving, so use the adverb.


  1. Form
Adjective + -ly
adjectiveadverb
dangerousdangerously
carefulcarefully
nicenicely
horriblehorribly
easyeasily
electronicelectronically

Irregular forms:

adjectiveadverb
goodwell
fastfast
hardhard

If the adjective ends in -y, change -y to -i. Then add -ly:

  • happy– happily
but:

  • shy– shyly
If the adjective ends in -le, the adverb ends in -ly:

  • terrible– terribly
If the adjective ends in -e, then add -ly:

  • safe– safely
► Not all words ending in -ly are adverbs:

  • adjectives ending in-ly: friendly, silly, lonely, ugly
  • nouns, ending in-ly: ally, bully, Italy, melancholy
  • verbs, ending in-ly: apply, rely, supply
There is no adverb for an adjective ending in -ly.

3. USE OF ADVERBS


3.1. TO MODIFY VERBS

The handball team played badly last Saturday.

3.2. TO MODIFY ADJECTIVES

It was an extremely bad match.

3.3. TO MODIFY ADVERBS

The handball team played extremely badly last Wednesday.

3.4. TO MODIFY QUANTITIES

There are quite a lot of people here.

3.5. TO MODIFY SENTENCES

Unfortunatelythe flight to Dallas had been cancelled.

 4. TYPES OF ADVERBS


4.1. ADVERBS OF MANNER

  • quickly
  • kindly

4.2. ADVERBS OF DEGREE

  • very
  • rather

4.3. ADVERBS OF FREQUENCY

  • often
  • sometimes

4.4. ADVERBS OF TIME

  • now
  • today

4.5. ADVERBS OF PLACE

  • here
  • nowhere


5. HOW DO KNOW WHETHER TO USE AN ADJECTIVE OR AN ADVERB?


John is a careful driver. – In this sentences we say how John is – careful. If we want to say that the careful John did not drive the usual way yesterday – we have to use the adverb:

  • Johndid not drive carefully

Here is another example:

  • I am aslow  (How am I? → slow  adjective)
  • I walkslowly(Ho do I walk?  slowly  adverb)


6. ADJECTIVE OR ADVERB AFTER SPECIAL VERBS


Both adjectives and adverbs may be used after look, smell and taste. Mind the change in meaning.
Here are two examples:

adjectiveadverb
The pizza tastes good.
(How is the pizza?)
Jamie Oliver can taste well.
(How can Jamie Oliver taste?)
Peter’s feet smell bad.
(How are his feet?)
Peter can smell badly.
(How can Peter smell?)

Do not get confused with good/well.

  • Linda looksgood(What type of person is she?)
  • Linda lookswell(How is Linda? – She may have been ill, but now she is fit again.)
  • How are you? – I’mwell, thank you.

One can assume that in the second/third sentence the adverb well is used, but this is wrong – well can be an adjective (meaning fit/healthy), or an adverb of the adjective good.

CONCLUSION:


  • Use theadjective when you say something about the person
  • Use theadverb, when you want to say about the action.

Where do adverbs of frequency go?
Adverbs of frequency show you how often something happens. This can be always = 100%, or never = 0%.
  • always
  • usually
  • regularly
  • normally
  • often
  • sometimes
  • occasionally
  • rarely
  • seldom
  • never

These adverbs can go before the main verb.

SubjectAuxiliaryAdverb of frequencyVerbRest
Ialwaysget upat 6.45.
Petercanusuallyplayfootball on Sundays.
Mandyhassometimesgotlots of homework.

 or after a form of to be (am, are, is) – (was, were).

SubjectAuxiliaryAdverb of frequencyRest
Susanisneverlate.

The adverbs often, usually, sometimes and occasionally can go at the beginning of a sentence.

  • SometimesI go swimming.
  • Oftenwe surf the internet.

Somtimes these adverbs can go at the end of a sentence.

  • We read books occasionally.

Até o próximo post!

sexta-feira, 10 de março de 2017

WEATHER AND SEASONS

                       

The weather is very important for americans and europeans, they use to check on it everyday before leaving the house because it can not only rain but also snow, have a storm or even a tornado. Because they take the weather very seriously it can be a very common conversation starter, but to be able to talk about the weather there are couple words that we first have to know because without it there´s no way we can talk about it. Let’s check what those words are:

HOT

Hot

COLD

Cold

WARM

Warm

RAINY

Windy


WINDY

Rainy















CLOUDY

Cloudy

FOGGY

Foggy

SUNNY

Sunny

To describe the weather we can make combinations as, today is hot and sunny, or, today is cold and windy.

There are 4 seasons of the year, let´s check what are them:

SPRING

Spring

SUMMER

Summer

FALL

Fall

WINTER

Winter

Now that we have check the vocabulary we can say that spring is sunny and warm, summer is hot and sunny, fall is cool and windy and winter is cold and windy. There are a lot of combinations you can make, now that you have the vocabulary have fun and try it.

Esse foi mais um post do Blog do Curso de Inglês Microcamp.